How To Choose the Correct Guitar Amplifier


guitar_bass_amp

So you’re thinking about getting an electric guitar amplifier.

Even more so, you’re thinking about buying your first one. That’s great!

You’ve made a great choice.

There are so many amps out there on the market but since we’re taking our first steps, let’s talk about where to start and what to look for in an amp for beginners.

What is a guitar amplifier and what does it do?

A guitar amplifier is a device that increases the power and sound of an electric guitar signal.

It does this by taking the weak signal from the guitar, and increasing the voltage so that it is loud enough to be heard through a speaker.

This is a very basic description of what an amplifier does, but it’s enough to get started.

Now that you know what an amplifier is, the next question is: what kind of music do you want to play?

Different amps are better for different styles of music.

For example, if you want to play metal or hard rock, you’ll want an amp with a lot of distortion.

If you’re into classic rock or blues, you’ll want an amp that has a clean sound.

Some amps can do both (they’re called combo amps), but most amps are designed for one specific style of music.

Once you know the type of music you want to play, it’s time to start thinking about your budget.

A good starter amp will cost between $100-$200, but there are some great amps out there for under $50.

It’s always better to buy an amplifier that sounds good to you than the one you don’t like because it’s cheap.

For example, if you want a Fender Strat Deluxe Reverb but can only afford the Mustang II, go with the affordable one so that you’ll enjoy playing it every day. You’ll also have more money left over for pedals or other gear down the line!

How much are you willing to spend on your amplifier?

As briefly mentioned above, a good starter amp will cost between $100-$200.

However, there are a lot of great amps out there for under $50.

It’s always better to buy an amplifier that sounds good to you than the one you don’t like because it’s cheap.

For example, if you like the sound of a Fender Strat Deluxe Reverb but can only afford the Mustang II, go with the affordable one so that you’ll enjoy playing it every day.

You’ll also have more money left over for pedals or other gear down the line!

Another thing to consider is wattage and size

There are three types of amps: combo amps heads w/cabs and separate head/cab units.

Combo amps are great because they’re easy to transport and sound good at most volumes.

The downsides to combos include their limited power (as compared to heads/cabs) and speakers which need replacing from time to time.

Heads with cabs are great because they sound good at high volumes and can take a beating.

The downside to this type of amp is the cost – it’s much more expensive than a combo.

Finally, separate head/cab units are designed to be played at high volumes in big venues.

These amps are very powerful but will blow your ears off if set too loud!

What kind of guitar amplifier do you want?

Combo amps are easy to transport and portable enough for most players.

The downsides include their limited power (as compared to heads/cabs) and speakers which need replacing from time to time.

Heads with cabs are great because they sound good at high volumes and can take a beating.

The downside to this type of amp is the cost – they’re much more expensive than a combo.

Separate head/cab units are designed to be played at high volumes in big venues.

These amps are very powerful but will blow your ears off if set too loud!

Finally, think about how many watts you need.

An amplifier’s wattage is how loudly it can play a signal before it starts to distort.

A good starter amp will have a wattage between 10-40 watts.

If you’re into metal or hard rock, you’ll want an amp with a lot of distortion and a higher wattage (50-100 watts).

Classic rock or blues players will be happy with an amp in the 10-40 watt range.

Tips for choosing an amp that will work well with your specific style of playing

If you want to play metal or hard rock, look for an amp with a lot of distortion.

If you’re into classic rock or blues, look for an amp that has a clean sound.

Again, some amps can do both (they’re called combo amps), but most amps are designed for one specific style of music.

Pros and cons of owning a tube or solid-state amplifier

There are two types of guitar amplifiers: tube and solid-state.

Tube amps, as the name suggests, use vacuum tubes to amplify the signal.

They’re considered the “guitar player’s” amp because they sound better than solid-state amps when driven hard.

However, they’re also more expensive and can be temperamental.

Solid-state amps use transistors instead of tubes and are more reliable but don’t sound as good as tube amps.

Which one is right for you?

Only you can decide that! Some guitarists swear by tube amps while others prefer solid-state. Try out a few different types until you find one you like the best.

Finally, you should definitely try out the guitar amplifier before buying it!

There are countless makes and models of amplifiers out there.

If you go to a music store with several different amps in mind, they’ll let you test them all out before choosing one.

Just make sure to take your time – don’t rush into anything!

When trying an amp out, make sure to set the volume at around 3-4 o’clock (if it has a “volume” knob).

Lower volumes won’t let you test the full power of the amplifier.

You also want to find that sweet spot where the amp starts distorting but isn’t too loud for comfort.

 

Read Also: My Gear Recommendations

Recent Posts

error: Content is protected !!